Author Topic: Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...  (Read 8472 times)

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Offline AnKaLi

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« on: June 25, 2008, 11:19:36 am »
So my freeflying days are still a few jumps off, but I wanted to ask, what are the benefits of a tight fitting freefly suit vs. a baggy one?

I've got that really baggy (hello raver pants) blue freefly suit and was thinking of taking it in some, but I want to figure out how much and all that jazz.

Thanks folks  :D
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Offline Evan

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Re: Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2008, 02:09:10 pm »
Quote from: "AnKaLi"
So my freeflying days are still a few jumps off, but I wanted to ask, what are the benefits of a tight fitting freefly suit vs. a baggy one?

I've got that really baggy (hello raver pants) blue freefly suit and was thinking of taking it in some, but I want to figure out how much and all that jazz.

Thanks folks  :D


Mainly, you just want to achieve a comfortable fall rate so that you will be in the middle of your range without too much effort.  This seems to be around 155-170 mph for most people.  As far as learning how to freefly, you can wear a baggier top with tighter pants or shorts to help with sit-flying/standing or baggier pants with a t-shirt to help stay on your head.  You are just creating more drag at one end of your body to help keep you vertical.  Personally, I would say just use your freefly suit as it is for a while (it won't matter that much for solo jumps anyway) until you get an idea of what your average fall rate is.  If it's down around 150-155, then you might want to take it in a bit.  I think a baggier suit can make it a little easier while you're learning and a tighter suit can give you more control once you get better at it (ie. you're doing more of the flying with your body instead of your suit).

Of course, if it's just ridiculously baggy I guess it could potentially cause some strange aerodynamics or excessive flapping or whatever, but you'll figure that out.  Tighter suits tend to be more popular if you get into freestyle.  It also depends a lot on what type of material it is and how thick or how many layers it is.

At least try it out a few times before going through too much trouble to change anything.

Of course some more experienced freeflyers might want to step in with some different opinions...  :)

Offline AnKaLi

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2008, 08:32:05 am »
yeah I know that baggy can be good in the air when you're trying to learn, I just don't want to be excessively baggy...
Thanks Evan  :)
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Offline Jeremy

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2008, 11:28:05 am »
I wouldn't say baggy is always better when you're trying to learn. I started out sit flying with Adam's old flamer suit. The jumpsuit was flying me, not the other way around. I had a much easier time learning to fly once I got a smaller suit that was more for my size.

Offline Evan

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2008, 11:51:21 am »
Quote from: "Jeremy"
I wouldn't say baggy is always better when you're trying to learn. I started out sit flying with Adam's old flamer suit. The jumpsuit was flying me, not the other way around. I had a much easier time learning to fly once I got a smaller suit that was more for my size.


Are you talking about learning to fly as in maintaining proximity to other people, taking docks, & doing transitions or just trying to stay vertical without spinning on solo jumps?

Just curious since I've never jumped with a really baggy suit, I've just heard people say that a little baggier rather than tighter tends to be easier when you're first starting out... on the other hand I've also heard that trends have been changing over the past few years and more experienced freeflyers have been switching from really baggy to a little bit tighter suits for better control.

Best bet is to just try some different suits/clothing if possible and see what works best for you since everyone is different..

Offline PETE

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2008, 12:11:34 pm »
I would say dont worry about what kind of suit you have just dont FF a RW.  It will be easier for you to get to a sit with a loose suit, and at this point loose is better. Once you start jumping with others, you can start playing with your suit. No matter what suit you have, if you can control your fall rate  within a good range it will work fine.
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Offline Jeremy

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Benefits of a jumpsuit fit...
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2008, 01:30:30 pm »
Quote from: "Evan"
Quote from: "Jeremy"
I wouldn't say baggy is always better when you're trying to learn. I started out sit flying with Adam's old flamer suit. The jumpsuit was flying me, not the other way around. I had a much easier time learning to fly once I got a smaller suit that was more for my size.


Are you talking about learning to fly as in maintaining proximity to other people, taking docks, & doing transitions or just trying to stay vertical without spinning on solo jumps?


All of the above.